DigitalChocolate.com »Trips Blog » WHAT’S NEXT FOR SOCIAL GAMES


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I want to shout-out a big thank you to those of you that are playing our new social games!!  We appreciate your support and feedback.  And I apologize for the many areas where we need to polish our work.  This is all very new and we’re learning fast from our mistakes.  It is exciting and humbling and we appreciate your patience.  We’re building a fun new neighborhood and we have a good idea of where we still need some construction work.  And we have a lot of detailed plans for more interior decorating across the board!  Here’s why we are excited.

An estimated $7 billion in virtual goods were sold in China last year, and another $1 billion in the Western World.  What gets me intrigued about this is the fact that the West is just getting started and we have 8.5 times more Gross Domestic Product than China.  That should generate enough buying power to suggest that when the West is comparable to the 2009 China market, it might be a $60 billion market in the West alone.  At that point on a global basis including all of Asia it would likely exceed $100 billion.  And I have no doubt of this; I expect it to happen in this decade.

The hottest market for virtual goods in the West is Facebook, where Zynga blossomed in the last year.  Many companies grew last year on Facebook from viral spread but it made the customer experience on Facebook very, “spammy”.  And Facebook no doubt did not like the diverting of both the Facebook experience and the spoils of monetization.  Hence, we have seen in the last few months a severe “dialing back” of notifications, invites, bookmarks and other app features on Facebook, the most dramatic of which went into effect on March 1, 2010.

How’s the social game industry doing in this wake?  Not so good:  out of the Top 25 publishers of social games with virtual goods, only two publishers increased their customer bases by at least 1 million customers since March 1 (Playdom and Digital Chocolate). In fact we were the only 2 companies that expanded by at least 20%; most of the others were flat or declined.  Several publishers have lost millions of customers.  And most of the games have declined in audience size.

The formula last year was viral growth through aggressive spam but that no longer works.  This creates a fundamental need for richer games that are more entertaining and meaningful, that will sincerely motivate players to recruit their friends because they really want to play with them.  That, for example, is how the entire Fantasy Sports industry of more than 30 million players got built.  Same with the 40 million Pokémon fans and today’s 6 million active players of Magic: The Gathering, a half-million of which will play in tournaments this year.  Going forward, it will be a challenge for many publishers to make games that are really good enough.

The spammy viral spread was also a free marketing department.  With no more free ride, growth can only come from an efficient combination of legitimate virality and efficient marketing to help spread the good word.  Again, as we look forward, many game companies on Facebook lack the financial resources to do enough advertising and lack the scale to cross-promote well.  And even more of them have games that don’t monetize enough to justify the advertising in the first place.  Maybe it didn’t matter last year when growth was free, but now it does.

One telling example of this trend is Playfish.  They had 5 of the Top 10 games on Facebook in January of 2009 but it can be seen in hindsight that 4 of them were not going to monetize because they could not make meaningful use of virtual goods.  As Playfish figured this out, they reduced product support and advertising for those 4 games and they all dropped out of the Top 10 within a year.  By contrast, Pet Society had the right characteristics and they were able to grow it like a weed.  It got the love, mushroomed in size and remained in the Top 10.  As we look at trend data from early 2010, it’s gotten even tougher and now, not even Pet Society is growing.

They’re not the only ones.  Zynga is flat; Crowdstar, RockYou, Slide, Meteor, LOLapps and 6 waves are way down.  Most of Playdom’s growth is from two hot new games that they are heavily marketing.  And these are the guys with cross-promotional scale; on a percentage basis the numbers are much worse for the little guys.  At Digital Chocolate we have been pleasantly surprised that we’ve been the fastest-growing developer in recent months because it must be about the games, as we are not doing a lot of marketing yet.  And we look forward to building cross-promotional scale that will make it easier for us.

Meanwhile, the release rate of new games has declined, as has the apparent abandonment rate of industry games that don’t have the right kind of lift-to-drag ratio.  I think many companies are now, “back to the drawing board”, figuring out how to deal with the new business requirements.

Another issue that is emerging is a spirited game of, “Platform Monopoly”.  I see a lot of big companies in California that seem to be trying to actually build, “Hotel California”.  These are guys that already have Boardwalk but want Park Place, and all the greens, too.  Many platforms have welcomed developers with open arms in recent years, proudly proclaiming offers of “Statue of Liberty” caliber freedom and opportunity.  Now developers are complaining and beginning to feel like Europeans in the early 1930s, not so sure about the guys that they voted into office and wondering if they should buy the explanations for increasingly suspicious actions.  Rumors have it that Zynga is working like crazy right now to migrate customers to their own URL.  The platform operators don’t seem to realize that consumers are going to soon be demanding a SaaS model (Software as a Service) for more games and applications.  They’re going to want access to their software services from all their devices, platforms, and networks they can get onto.  The public is going to want to decide when, where and how they pay and play.  They’re not going to be boxed in any more than they would have been with voice, email, browsing, SMS, and MMS, all of which began as platform walled gardens and became interoperable as a result of public demand.

Going forward, spammy isn’t going to cut it.  Shallow gameplay isn’t either; or games that don’t monetize.  Lack of funding for marketing will be another killer.  Walled gardens, or depending on any one platform will be a business liability and a negative for consumers.  The industry has a ton of potential but has to overcome these issues.  The $7 billion spent on virtual goods in China last year should give us great hope, but let’s not screw it up.

http://www.insidesocialgames.com/2009/10/30/the-7-billion-asian-virtual-goods-market-in-powerpoint/

http://www.appdata.com/leaderboard/developers/

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17 comments

  1. April 16, 2010

    [...] Hawkins, CEO of Digital Chocolate, posted an interesting article on the company’s blog last night, suggesting that growth in social gaming has become [...]

  2. Natalie
    April 16, 2010

    Hello, having just read your blog it has raised a multitude of questions in my head. With the West due to catch up in terms of money spent on virtual goods as compared to China how difficult do you think it will become to guage consumer demand and meet expectations when faced with the challenges associated with users feeling spammed? Also, with your track record of being ahead of the curve in terms of creativity do you thin that in fact this situation could be to your advantage as against competitors?

  3. Trip Hawkins
    April 16, 2010

    @Natalie — The definition of spam is relative and game messages can be better organized. Many people are only on Facebook to play games, so to them it’s not spam. Other Facebook users may not play games and may not want game messages. Right now it is a bit like two radio stations with overlapping frequencies, so they are interfering with each other. One of my personal goals is to learn how not to think too far ahead of likely customer behavior. I’ll be delving into more detail on future blog posts.

  4. April 23, 2010

    [...] Hawkins, CEO of Digital Chocolate, posted an interesting article on the company’s blog last night, suggesting that growth in social gaming has become increasingly [...]

  5. April 30, 2010

    [...] Skipping down a bit, NanoStar Siege is the second Nanoverse game from Digital Chocolate. Neither title has exactly burst out of the gates, but the company  has a longer-term plan that revolves around the NanoStar brand — and it is seeing some consistent overall growth. [...]

  6. April 30, 2010

    [...] Skipping down a bit, NanoStar Siege is the second Nanoverse game from Digital Chocolate. Neither title has exactly burst out of the gates, but the company  has a longer-term plan that revolves around the NanoStar brand — and it is seeing some consistent overall growth. [...]

  7. May 7, 2010

    [...] Chocolate CEO and Electronic Arts founder Trip Hawkins noted last month that developers will need to find new ways to grow their user bases without notifications: [...]

  8. May 10, 2010

    [...] notes, former EA founder and current CEO of Digital Chocolate wrote about this very subject on his blog last month, saying, “The formula last year was viral growth through aggressive spam but that [...]

  9. May 10, 2010

    [...] notes, former EA founder and current CEO of Digital Chocolate wrote about this very subject on his blog last month, saying, “The formula last year was viral growth through aggressive spam but that [...]

  10. May 10, 2010

    [...] notes, former EA founder and current CEO of Digital Chocolate wrote about this very subject on his blog last month, saying, “The formula last year was viral growth through aggressive spam but that [...]

  11. May 10, 2010

    [...] notes, former EA founder and current CEO of Digital Chocolate wrote about this very subject on his blog last month, saying, “The formula last year was viral growth through aggressive spam but that [...]

  12. BIG BABY
    June 26, 2010

    IN MILLIONAIRE CITY. WHY CAN’T I MOVE HOUSES AND BUILDING AROUND? I WOULD LIKE TO MOVE THING WITH OUT HAVING TO TEAR THEM DOWN. IS THIS POSSIBLE?

  13. June 28, 2010

    We will actually be releasing this new feature soon — within 1 to 2 weeks. Please check back often to see all the updates. Also, if you ever have any feedback or ideas, you can visit our forums: http://forums.digitalchocolate.com/. We read all comments and appreciate your thoughts on the game. Thanks for playing!

  14. July 2, 2010

    Hello. Your comment has been reviewed and the appropriate parties have been notified. How ever we are currently in the middle of relocating our support center, and no one is available to handle your requests. Please try support-iphone@digitalchocolate.com and be sure to include the Operating system version on your iPod and any other relevant information you have.

  15. December 1, 2010

    [...] notes, former EA founder and current CEO of Digital Chocolate wrote about this very subject on his blog last month, saying, “The formula last year was viral growth through aggressive spam but that [...]

  16. June 3, 2011

    Great post. It is really improve to us. Its give us lots of interest and satisfaction. Its opportunity are so great and targeting fashion so speedy. Its genuinely a great article. It gives me a great many pleasure and interest.

  17. August 6, 2011

    [...] Trip Hawkins from {Digital Chocolate}: http://blog.digitalchocolate.com/?p=518 [...]

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